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ED Meds vs Testosterone


smoothburnn

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smoothburnn
42 minutes ago, sdcruiser said:

The results and explanations are on your website info. You can see your numbers there. 

I never signed up .  Guess I should .  Been procrastinating 

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Jdavid1976
58 minutes ago, 4dino said:

What is HCG and what do you mean by shrinkage?

If you start taking TRT, specifically injections it can turn off your body from producing its own testosterone.  When that happens your testicles can shrink.  HCG basically insures your body will continue to produce its own Testosterone.  

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El Oso
47 minutes ago, Jdavid1976 said:

If you start taking TRT, specifically injections it can turn off your body from producing its own testosterone.  When that happens your testicles can shrink.  HCG basically insures your body will continue to produce its own Testosterone.  

Also taking DIM pills will reduce your cortisol levels; therefore making it easier for your body to produce natural testosterone!!  I buy DIM online from Swansons Vitamins of Fargo North Dakota!! 

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Jefffffrey
13 hours ago, Jefffffrey said:

Unfortunately, at least where I live, the people who follow the science have decided to keep the drive thru open, the Cheetos and tweenkies on the shelves, but the gyms are closed.  I wonder if T levels are going down across the board?  

Might partially explain the national sperm shortage crisis.

https://www.insidehook.com/daily_brief/news-opinion/pandemic-sperm-shortage-donors

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I been hypogonadism  since puberty. I had to take testosterone therapy all my life.  I also had extremely high level of HGH. I never felt right unless my T is in the  2000 range.

1. The gel - I love the almost immiediate effect increasing the levels of Testosterone upon applying the gel but hated the dry skin and crash inbetween doses. With the gel I was useing 2 packs a everyday.

2. The foam  - Almost the same as the gel but not as fast and not as strong feeling as the gel. Still gave me dry skin condition and my T levels weren't as high.  Both the Gel and Foam I'd rub on my abdomen. 

3. The patch - I never felt good taking the patch as the itching at the site was super annoying. I only had a short time using the patch.

4. Depo Testosterione injections. - This is the longest replacement therapy I am on. I inject myself once every 3 weeks. My T levels are super high when injected and feel the crash when nearing my next injection. In my experiance this therapy is the best for me. I never had any erection issues with any testosterone therapy. I think the gel gives me the longest erection. I know my organs will eventually fail but so far I am below normal range for my kidneys.

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Jdavid1976
On 1/12/2021 at 5:48 PM, upper said:

I am on. I inject myself once every 3 weeks. My T levels are super high when injected and feel the crash

Bro do you think thats too long in between injections?  Do you do it yourself? or go somewhere?

I inject once a week and at times, when not traveling for a period of time I actually break that once a week into 2 times a week.  

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I tried once a week then 10 days and every 2 weeks. Every endocrinologist has difference of opinion but 3 weeks is fine. I inject myself and in the past gone to the clinic for injections. 

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3ls3gvnd0

I'll probably use TRT or HGH at some point but I'd like to put it off as long as possible.  I don't really have a fear of needles but I don't really like the idea of injecting myself (and there's zero chance I could do it daily, as I think is required for HGH).  It seems like most of the current treatments require a bit more work that I'm willing to put in.  But, of course, I'm lazy.  If they made a pill that had the same results, I'd definitely be interested as I get closer to 60.  But, alas, as things currently stand, HGH and testosterone need to be absorbed directly into the blood stream.  (C'mon medical people... invent!)

I'm rapidly approaching my mid-50s and just got my testosterone measured for the first time (that I'm aware of) and, fortunately, it's in good shape at the moment - 7.13 total T (well above the average for a 30-year old) and .0119 free T (roughly average for a 30-year old), so there's no issue at the moment, but... it's a comin' down the pike sure as the sunrise... so I like to try to keep up with the various treatments.  I regularly use generic Viagra for sex... probably more as an insurance policy than anything else as I sometimes forget and don't notice a big difference; but there is a difference, especially as a relationship goes longer and some of the initial fire burns off... my blue friendo aids in duration.

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GuntherMT
On 1/14/2021 at 8:05 AM, Jdavid1976 said:

Bro do you think thats too long in between injections?  Do you do it yourself? or go somewhere?

I inject once a week and at times, when not traveling for a period of time I actually break that once a week into 2 times a week.  

I spent years trying to get a doctor to figure out why I was exhausted and tired all the time even when I'd slept all night for a week.

I eventually found a doctor who actually ran a bunch of tests instead of just randomly diagnosing something and found I had two issues.

1) Sleep apnea.  I thought I was getting good sleep, when in reality.. not so much, I had horrible sleep apnea.  Completely fixed with a CPAP machine (this was when I was in my 40's).

2) Super low vitamin D and Testosterone. 

The vitamin D was handled easily by starting to take 2000iu of D per day in the morning.  The low-T took a lot longer to settle out.  The patches didn't work, the gel didn't work.. basically I have skin that doesn't absorb the medicine.  In the end I got to injections.  I inject myself 1 time every 2 weeks, and I get labs every 6 months to make sure everything remains at a good therapeutic level.  I've been on the shots for probably 5 years now, and my T levels have remained steady with no change to the amount or interval.  I try to schedule my lab work at least a week after the injection date so that the test is showing the 'in between' levels and not that post injection spike.

FWIW I had no 'sexual' issues prior to or after the TRT, but my overall well-being and energy level is completely different since getting on the CPAP and getting my T-levels up to normal.

I don't take any of the supplements mentioned in this thread (DIM or HGH) and my doctor has never mentioned them.

 

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Dulla
1 hour ago, GuntherMT said:

1) Sleep apnea.  I thought I was getting good sleep, when in reality.. not so much, I had horrible sleep apnea.  Completely fixed with a CPAP machine (this was when I was in my 40's).

I had a bad habit of sleeping with the laptop next to me, surfing whenever I  awoke and so for very very long years had the bedroom light on the entire night.  a few days of the week I used to get completely sleepy at work. The remedy I came up with was sleep in the car when whenever I am like that.  Lucky I did not have a boss following my moves all the time.  Past few years, no more of such BS.  I got to bed early, keep the light off and now I am good for 8 hour sleep at night.  Feeling much better and alert during the day.

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Dulla
On 2/26/2021 at 11:00 AM, GuntherMT said:

2) Super low vitamin D and Testosterone. 

I don't think there is a better information packed video than this as to how Vitamin D is vital to hour health.  A video worth a share to everyone you care about.

 

00:01:25 - Vitamin D is not only a vitamin, it is also a hormone that affects gene transcription.
00:03:53 - The difference between a vitamin and a hormone.
00:04:27 - Sources and metabolism of vitamin D https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7679797/ https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327816878_Vitamin_D_and_Vitamin_D_Deficiency_in_Ireland_-_A_Call_to_Action
00:07:30 - High fructose corn syrup increases the conversion of active-1,25-Vitamin D to the inactive-1,24,25-Vitamin D. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23571713/
00:07:51 - A major cause of vitamin D deficiency is inadequate exposure to sunlight. Americans only spend on average 7% of the day outside. https://www.nature.com/articles/7500165
00:08:56 - Why the protective effect of vitamin D for respiratory infections is likely not due to confounding factors.
00:10:03 - The incidence of influenza is highest during months when vitamin D levels are lowest. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2870528/
00:10:16 - Vitamin D levels are lower in those with higher BMI and renal disease. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10966885/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15951480/
00:10:35 - Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of infections. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0960076006004304 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2870528/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15321847/
00:11:51 - Defining vitamin D deficiency, insufficiency, and optimal blood levels.
00:13:20 - Aging decreases the capacity of human skin to produce vitamin D3. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2997282/
00:13:46 - People of with darker skin have lower levels of vitamin D. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20848081/
00:15:29 - Vitamin D supplementation promotes bone health and cardiovascular health, although dosing is still unclear. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4600954/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21505219/
00:16:19 - Epidemiological data shows that vitamin D levels are inversely associated with respiratory infection mortality. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7468980/
00:18:25 - A systematic review and meta-analysis shows that vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of respiratory tract infections. https://www.bmj.com/content/356/bmj.i6583
00:20:40 - "Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren" https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20219962/
00:22:01 - Similarities between COVID-19 and Vitamin D deficiency.
00:22:56 - Vitamin D deficiency mirrors other viral infections.
00:23:30 - Autopsies of patients with COVID-19 show a 9-fold increase in lung blood clots. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2015432
00:23:50 - People who are more likely to be vitamin D deficient also are more likely to die from COVID-19. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2521-4
00:25:14 - Does smoking decrease the risk of COVID-19 mortality?
00:26:52 - COVID-19 mortality risk increases with higher latitudes. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32311755/
00:28:18 - Countries with higher overall vitamin D levels have lower COVID-19 infection rates and mortality rates. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7202265/
00:29:37 - A positive COVID-19 tests is associated with a lower vitamin D status. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32397511/
00:30:30 - Vitamin D levels modestly drop when the immune system is activated. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33217408/
00:31:11 - Those with lower vitamin D levels had increased risk of contracting COVID-19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7404739/ https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.09.04.20188268v1.full.pdf https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0239252
00:37:33 - Is vitamin D a proxy for good health or a determinant of good health?
00:38:58 - Of those who are infected with COVID-19, lower vitamin D levels are associated with worse symptoms. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7456620/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32927735/
00:41:07 - A prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized trial showed that taking vitamin D early in hospitalization significantly decreased the risk of requiring ICU level of care. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7456194/
00:43:45 - Elderly individuals in France who supplemented with 80,000IU of vitamin D within the previous month had a higher survival rate than those who supplemented over a month ago. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096007602030296X
00:44:41 - Vitamin D did not improve mortality or symptom severity of hospitalized COVID-19 patients when given late and in a single, large dose. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.11.16.20232397v1
00:46:18 - 60,000 IU of daily vitamin D for a week in COVID-19 patients increased the likelihood of testing negative by day 21. https://pmj.bmj.com/content/early/2020/11/12/postgradmedj-2020-139065
00:47:20 - In those with COVID-19, having serum vitamin D levels <20 ng/mL was associated with significantly higher mortality and higher inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNFalpha, ferritin). https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-77093-z
00:49:11 - Vitamin D fortification and supplementation practices vary by country. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30096919/ https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/96/7/1911/2833671
00:51:47 - Vitamin D is one of the safest fat soluble vitamins and toxicity is extremely rare https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158375/
00:54:19 - Bioavailability of vitamin D is high for low doses and plateaus out as dose increases. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25372709/
00:57:58 - Concluding thoughts.

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