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American Couple Gives Up their 20 Year Relationship with Mexico

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Wednesday, July 22, 2020

True Story: American Couple Gives Up their 20 Year Relationship with Mexico

 
Yaqui for Borderland Beat from: MND  / smtimes / TY Kencito
karger.jpg
After property invasions, cartel impunity, criminal banks and incompetence at the top it's time to go                                     "After a 20-year relationship, I’m giving up on Mexico"
                                                           Kelly and Kenneth
This is NOT an Op-Ed, It is a true story and the opinion of the writer and victim, a retired dentist from Fort Worth, Texas.

I am ending a 20-year relationship with Mexico and that is very sad for me. It’s kind of like the end of a marriage. At some point, the relationship turns so sour that one of the parties has to leave. In this case, it is me.
 
What makes this even more sad is the fact that I love Mexico. I love its natural beauty, from the desert, to the mountains to the pristine beaches. My family has loved it all. But most importantly, we have loved the Mexican people. Our relationships are more like family than even friends. I have personally invested millions of dollars in your country. But I give up. Your government clearly does not want me any longer.
 
I want to make it clear that I am not here to lecture Mexico. I am not here to tell it what to do or how to do it. It is simply not my place to do so. I am only letting Mexico know why our relationship failed and maybe, if it so desires, not to have so many future failures. Let me share with you my story.



Two decades ago, my brother and his wife bought a beautiful property in San Miguel de Allende and established roots. Deep roots. He built a beautiful home, two casitas, hired full-time staff whom he considers family, and started giving back to his community. 
images-5.jpg
 
He, and particularly his wife Kelly, started a dog rescue program for all the starving street dogs around town. They have rescued hundreds of animals from starvation and abuse and set up a spay/ neuter program second to none. Why? It’s part of what our mother taught us: give back to your community. This is part of our DNA.

While all of this was happening in San Miguel, I went to work in Quintana Roo. I bought a derelict house on the ocean in Puerto Aventuras and put 10 million pesos into it to restore it to glory. I also bought beach property around Mahahual, 20 hectares on Lake Bacalar and a 2,000-hectare ranch that had been abandoned near Chetumal. We then went to work.
laguna-xu-ha.jpg
                                                                   Lake Bacalar
 
Thugs at the gates:
We hired seven full-time employees to work the ranch, protect the property from poachers (we have deer, tapirs, jaguar and puma just to name a few of the animals we protect). There is a 500-hectare lake on the ranch as well and poachers were gill netting with 100-meter nets and destroying the fishery for generations to come. We stopped that from happening. Birds have returned and fish now abound. We gave back to nature and the community.
 
Our workers who come and go each day are well paid and fed breakfast and lunch. Our foreman lives full-time in a house we built for him and his lovely family. They all get health insurance, he gets a truck to drive, free gas, free food, free cell phone, and internet. Basically everything is paid for and he gets to use his salary as discretionary income. It’s a great deal for him but it also works great for us. It is a true win-win for all of us.
 
And how have I been treated? Not well. My ranch has been invaded twice. Once with 10 men and guns threatening to kill all the workers if they did not leave immediately. We called the police. What did they do? Nothing. Nothing at all. It took one year and over 2 million pesos to correct the wrong and get my ranch back from the thugs. Why would your system treat honest people like this? It is truly beyond me.
 
I have another property that I am fighting an invasion on and have been doing so for over three years. Sure I have won the battles in court so far but they are still on my property and I have spent over 200,000 pesos on lawyers. Will I win? Yes, but I have no desire to keep fighting this battle. Mexico requires me to keep spending money simply to hold on to those things that I have already bought and legally paid for. Does this seem insane only to me?
 
My brother in San Miguel was attempting to return home from a drive to Puerto Vallarta where he has a beachfront lot. On his way home, he was stopped at a cartel roadblock and robbed. When they attempted to steal his vehicle also, he did a high speed escape past a burning bus back to Puerto. He and his wife then had to fly home and have a driver get his vehicle back home for him. In what universe does this make sense? An honest citizen or visitor cannot travel down a major highway safely?
 
download-1.jpgIt gets far worse in my opinion. My neighbor who owns a nearby ranch was in Tamaulipas two years ago buying some cattle from local ranchers who were fleeing from the cartel. These poor ranchers had lost everything and were simply trying to sell what they could and escape, leaving their homes, ranches and other possessions behind. While my friend Jacob was there, word came that another cattle buyer on the adjoining ranch had been kidnapped and they were possibly coming for Jacob. He immediately left the ranch and went back to Quintana Roo.
 
A cartel convoy on a Mexican highway in 2018:
Mexico has turned over entire states to the cartel. If I told someone that I could not drive from Texas to Mississippi because Louisiana had been taken over by criminals, they would look at me as if I had two heads. Never would the U.S. allow criminals to take over a highway much less an entire state. If a cartel attempted to set up a roadblock on a highway in the U.S., a SWAT team of snipers would kill them all within an hour.

download.jpg
Jacob’s sister and her son were killed along with many more recently in northern Mexico by the cartel. Murdered — no, not murdered, more like slaughtered — without cause and so far Mexico has done very little to right this horrible wrong. I guess President López Obrador’s philosophy of hugs not guns seems to be prevailing. You have to understand how strange this all sounds to Americans. We are to hug murdering thugs instead of shooting them? Sorry, but I had rather send them to hell that very day.

images-4.jpg
I think the final straw that broke the camel’s back came last year when Monex stole over 20 million pesos from our accounts. We had money in the account one month and the next month, bank employees had stolen every peso. Many newspapers and TV networks reported that 158 accounts and nearly 800 million pesos had been robbed from the accounts of Americans and other foreigners. For many of these people, it was their life savings.
 
Did bank officials from Monex get arrested and prosecuted? No, they did not. Has Monex replaced the stolen money in full to those depositors?  No, for the most part they have not. In fact, my brother and I have yet to receive one peso of the money stolen from us by the bank. Sure we have filed criminal charges and civil actions but it might be many years before the Mexican government forces this criminal bank, Monex, to reimburse our funds.
190926-cons-monex-victims-cs-433p_8d5b49b48a4f4db662a247b4897b0201.fit-760w.jpg
                                                           Kelly and Ken Karger
The MONEX Scam: $7 million USD vanished from Expat bank accounts
Fraud Mexico Monex San Miguel De Allende Scam
American families retiring to Mexico must heed the warning of those scammed out of an estimated $7 million or more by a local banker, according to NBC News.

“It’s all gone. All the money is gone,” fraud victim Kelly Karger was told by her husband, per the report. “I just remember bending [over], just stopping in the street thinking, ‘I’m going to be sick.'”

“I was speechless,” Kathy Machir, 67, another US expat who was a victim of the Monex bank fraud, who was left with roughly 40 cents in her account, told NBC News. “It just gives you a sense of ultimate betrayal, loss, horror.”

The Grupo Financiero Monex banker Marcela Zavala Taylor allegedly took personal interest in her clients, asking about their families, handling their finances, and then taking them without a trace – including her own relatives – per the report.

For more on the Monex Bank fraud scam use the smtimes link at top or here.

We even hand delivered a letter to López Obrador himself begging for help. Nothing happened. A low level bureaucrat called us and explained he had been handed the complaint from a superior but it really wasn’t in his jurisdiction and he had no idea why it was handed down to him. He promptly did nothing.
 
This is why I fear López Obrador is worse than corrupt; he is incompetent. Maybe he can just give Monex a hug and then they will give us back the money they stole. If you want to see further details on this massive crime and cover up, check out bancomonexfraud.com.
 
No more high hopes for López Obrador:
 
amlo-hug.jpgI have another friend who is a pilot of private jets in Mexico. He and his family were on vacation in San Antonio, Texas, when his 12-year-old daughter opened the door on their rental car and accidentally scratched the adjoining car. The owner of that car jumped out and started verbally abusing my friend, Esteban, and his daughter. Esteban assured him that he had insurance and would pay for any damages. This did not appease the guy.
 
He threatened physical violence against Esteban’s daughter. Esteban called 911 and was shocked when the police showed up in less than three minutes, listened to what Esteban had to say and then handcuffed the man and took him off to jail for making threats. Esteban told me this would never happen in Mexico. But it should. Mexico deserves better than it is getting.
 
I had great hopes for López Obrador after Peña Nieto proved to be pretty much a failure. As I expressed those hopes to my Mexican friends about AMLO taking office, they almost all universally would shrug their shoulders and say, “We shall see. We have been promised all of this before.” Their attitude reminded me of a Robert Earl Keene song that goes like this: “The road goes on forever and the party never ends.” Except here we have to change the lyrics to “The road goes on forever and the corruption never ends.” As I wrote earlier, I really don’t believe López Obrador is corrupt. I think his office is worse: incompetent.
 
My brother is a lawyer by trade. He talks about the difference between a first world country versus a third world country. He always says it is mis-defined. People think that a country is third world if it is poor. This is not true. It is third world if rule of law and more specifically, honoring contracts and enforcing them is the true measure of a country’s status.  Does Mexico honor contracts? Not in the least.
 
Property rights are destroyed by invasions that take years to resolve and the sanctity of bank accounts and the security of those deposits mean nothing in Mexico. Even notaries and public registries falsify property sales and say no leans exist when in fact they do. You only find out after the purchase. These are not isolated incidents in Mexico.
nmex4.png
 
The municipality of Tulum, by rule of guns not law, seized boutique hotels and beach properties and threw their true owners out on the whim of a corrupt politician for personal gain. Property rights meant nothing and in the three or so years after these Tulum thefts, properties have still not been returned to the rightful owners. What a travesty of justice. Even when these sorts of travesties are recognized, the Mexican legal system does nothing to correct the errors.
 
Unprecedented levels of violence:
We really believed Mexico was changing 20 years ago. New auto plants, more hotels, more jobs and a true middle class starting to arise. We had hope and I think the Mexican people had hope too. But in the last five years we have witnessed the rise of the cartels stealing oil, cattle, avocados and anything else available, the rise of violence in unprecedented levels and the failure of the Mexican government to actually change anything. The only thing that changed was the slogan: hugs not guns. This is true insanity on a national level.
 
I wish I could say that I left Mexico in better shape than I found it. For my properties, this is true. But for Mexico in general it is not. I wish I could effect change but I can’t. I don’t get to vote, I don’t get to express an opinion to politicians or government workers and no one really cares what I have to say. The only protest afforded me is with my feet and I choose to leave.
 
I hope and pray that Mexico finds its way out of the pit it has dug. The Mexican people deserve better than what they are getting. They deserve hope, justice, fairness, and honesty. Right now, they are getting none of these.
 
Borderland Beat Reporter

 

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Trav

We will keep here as other thread is about purchasing property in Mx. Adm

 

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Erik

 

Sorry to Say but Mexican People in This SEXENIO = 6 year Term.

Is Praying to Patron Saint . MALO = Manuel Andrez Lopez Obrador.

 

Mexico's president 'hugs not bullets' cartel policy:wtf1:

 

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huatulco
On 7/23/2020 at 9:54 PM, invisibleman said:

If a cartel attempted to set up a roadblock on a highway in the U.S., a SWAT team of snipers would kill them all within an hour.

I'm not so sure about that. The difference would be that a citizen would use his 2d Amendment rights and blow the f-ers away. 

The article says way too much. The authors went in and got taken.  They didn't do their homework and cut corners.  They need to look in the mirror to see who's at fault.  Have they ever heard of the S&L crisis in the US a few years ago?  You pick up the news and at least once a month some idiot bookkeeper or trusted employee is arrested for embezzlement in the US.  

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tjway
On 7/23/2020 at 11:54 PM, invisibleman said:

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

True Story: American Couple Gives Up their 20 Year Relationship with Mexico

 
Yaqui for Borderland Beat from: MND  / smtimes / TY Kencito
karger.jpg
After property invasions, cartel impunity, criminal banks and incompetence at the top it's time to go                                     "After a 20-year relationship, I’m giving up on Mexico"
                                                           Kelly and Kenneth
This is NOT an Op-Ed, It is a true story and the opinion of the writer and victim, a retired dentist from Fort Worth, Texas.

I am ending a 20-year relationship with Mexico and that is very sad for me. It’s kind of like the end of a marriage. At some point, the relationship turns so sour that one of the parties has to leave. In this case, it is me.
 
What makes this even more sad is the fact that I love Mexico. I love its natural beauty, from the desert, to the mountains to the pristine beaches. My family has loved it all. But most importantly, we have loved the Mexican people. Our relationships are more like family than even friends. I have personally invested millions of dollars in your country. But I give up. Your government clearly does not want me any longer.
 
I want to make it clear that I am not here to lecture Mexico. I am not here to tell it what to do or how to do it. It is simply not my place to do so. I am only letting Mexico know why our relationship failed and maybe, if it so desires, not to have so many future failures. Let me share with you my story.



Two decades ago, my brother and his wife bought a beautiful property in San Miguel de Allende and established roots. Deep roots. He built a beautiful home, two casitas, hired full-time staff whom he considers family, and started giving back to his community. 
images-5.jpg
 
He, and particularly his wife Kelly, started a dog rescue program for all the starving street dogs around town. They have rescued hundreds of animals from starvation and abuse and set up a spay/ neuter program second to none. Why? It’s part of what our mother taught us: give back to your community. This is part of our DNA.

While all of this was happening in San Miguel, I went to work in Quintana Roo. I bought a derelict house on the ocean in Puerto Aventuras and put 10 million pesos into it to restore it to glory. I also bought beach property around Mahahual, 20 hectares on Lake Bacalar and a 2,000-hectare ranch that had been abandoned near Chetumal. We then went to work.
laguna-xu-ha.jpg
                                                                   Lake Bacalar
 
Thugs at the gates:
We hired seven full-time employees to work the ranch, protect the property from poachers (we have deer, tapirs, jaguar and puma just to name a few of the animals we protect). There is a 500-hectare lake on the ranch as well and poachers were gill netting with 100-meter nets and destroying the fishery for generations to come. We stopped that from happening. Birds have returned and fish now abound. We gave back to nature and the community.
 
Our workers who come and go each day are well paid and fed breakfast and lunch. Our foreman lives full-time in a house we built for him and his lovely family. They all get health insurance, he gets a truck to drive, free gas, free food, free cell phone, and internet. Basically everything is paid for and he gets to use his salary as discretionary income. It’s a great deal for him but it also works great for us. It is a true win-win for all of us.
 
And how have I been treated? Not well. My ranch has been invaded twice. Once with 10 men and guns threatening to kill all the workers if they did not leave immediately. We called the police. What did they do? Nothing. Nothing at all. It took one year and over 2 million pesos to correct the wrong and get my ranch back from the thugs. Why would your system treat honest people like this? It is truly beyond me.
 
I have another property that I am fighting an invasion on and have been doing so for over three years. Sure I have won the battles in court so far but they are still on my property and I have spent over 200,000 pesos on lawyers. Will I win? Yes, but I have no desire to keep fighting this battle. Mexico requires me to keep spending money simply to hold on to those things that I have already bought and legally paid for. Does this seem insane only to me?
 
My brother in San Miguel was attempting to return home from a drive to Puerto Vallarta where he has a beachfront lot. On his way home, he was stopped at a cartel roadblock and robbed. When they attempted to steal his vehicle also, he did a high speed escape past a burning bus back to Puerto. He and his wife then had to fly home and have a driver get his vehicle back home for him. In what universe does this make sense? An honest citizen or visitor cannot travel down a major highway safely?
 
download-1.jpgIt gets far worse in my opinion. My neighbor who owns a nearby ranch was in Tamaulipas two years ago buying some cattle from local ranchers who were fleeing from the cartel. These poor ranchers had lost everything and were simply trying to sell what they could and escape, leaving their homes, ranches and other possessions behind. While my friend Jacob was there, word came that another cattle buyer on the adjoining ranch had been kidnapped and they were possibly coming for Jacob. He immediately left the ranch and went back to Quintana Roo.
 
A cartel convoy on a Mexican highway in 2018:
Mexico has turned over entire states to the cartel. If I told someone that I could not drive from Texas to Mississippi because Louisiana had been taken over by criminals, they would look at me as if I had two heads. Never would the U.S. allow criminals to take over a highway much less an entire state. If a cartel attempted to set up a roadblock on a highway in the U.S., a SWAT team of snipers would kill them all within an hour.

download.jpg
Jacob’s sister and her son were killed along with many more recently in northern Mexico by the cartel. Murdered — no, not murdered, more like slaughtered — without cause and so far Mexico has done very little to right this horrible wrong. I guess President López Obrador’s philosophy of hugs not guns seems to be prevailing. You have to understand how strange this all sounds to Americans. We are to hug murdering thugs instead of shooting them? Sorry, but I had rather send them to hell that very day.

images-4.jpg
I think the final straw that broke the camel’s back came last year when Monex stole over 20 million pesos from our accounts. We had money in the account one month and the next month, bank employees had stolen every peso. Many newspapers and TV networks reported that 158 accounts and nearly 800 million pesos had been robbed from the accounts of Americans and other foreigners. For many of these people, it was their life savings.
 
Did bank officials from Monex get arrested and prosecuted? No, they did not. Has Monex replaced the stolen money in full to those depositors?  No, for the most part they have not. In fact, my brother and I have yet to receive one peso of the money stolen from us by the bank. Sure we have filed criminal charges and civil actions but it might be many years before the Mexican government forces this criminal bank, Monex, to reimburse our funds.
190926-cons-monex-victims-cs-433p_8d5b49b48a4f4db662a247b4897b0201.fit-760w.jpg
                                                           Kelly and Ken Karger
The MONEX Scam: $7 million USD vanished from Expat bank accounts
Fraud Mexico Monex San Miguel De Allende Scam
American families retiring to Mexico must heed the warning of those scammed out of an estimated $7 million or more by a local banker, according to NBC News.

“It’s all gone. All the money is gone,” fraud victim Kelly Karger was told by her husband, per the report. “I just remember bending [over], just stopping in the street thinking, ‘I’m going to be sick.'”

“I was speechless,” Kathy Machir, 67, another US expat who was a victim of the Monex bank fraud, who was left with roughly 40 cents in her account, told NBC News. “It just gives you a sense of ultimate betrayal, loss, horror.”

The Grupo Financiero Monex banker Marcela Zavala Taylor allegedly took personal interest in her clients, asking about their families, handling their finances, and then taking them without a trace – including her own relatives – per the report.

For more on the Monex Bank fraud scam use the smtimes link at top or here.

We even hand delivered a letter to López Obrador himself begging for help. Nothing happened. A low level bureaucrat called us and explained he had been handed the complaint from a superior but it really wasn’t in his jurisdiction and he had no idea why it was handed down to him. He promptly did nothing.
 
This is why I fear López Obrador is worse than corrupt; he is incompetent. Maybe he can just give Monex a hug and then they will give us back the money they stole. If you want to see further details on this massive crime and cover up, check out bancomonexfraud.com.
 
No more high hopes for López Obrador:
 
amlo-hug.jpgI have another friend who is a pilot of private jets in Mexico. He and his family were on vacation in San Antonio, Texas, when his 12-year-old daughter opened the door on their rental car and accidentally scratched the adjoining car. The owner of that car jumped out and started verbally abusing my friend, Esteban, and his daughter. Esteban assured him that he had insurance and would pay for any damages. This did not appease the guy.
 
He threatened physical violence against Esteban’s daughter. Esteban called 911 and was shocked when the police showed up in less than three minutes, listened to what Esteban had to say and then handcuffed the man and took him off to jail for making threats. Esteban told me this would never happen in Mexico. But it should. Mexico deserves better than it is getting.
 
I had great hopes for López Obrador after Peña Nieto proved to be pretty much a failure. As I expressed those hopes to my Mexican friends about AMLO taking office, they almost all universally would shrug their shoulders and say, “We shall see. We have been promised all of this before.” Their attitude reminded me of a Robert Earl Keene song that goes like this: “The road goes on forever and the party never ends.” Except here we have to change the lyrics to “The road goes on forever and the corruption never ends.” As I wrote earlier, I really don’t believe López Obrador is corrupt. I think his office is worse: incompetent.
 
My brother is a lawyer by trade. He talks about the difference between a first world country versus a third world country. He always says it is mis-defined. People think that a country is third world if it is poor. This is not true. It is third world if rule of law and more specifically, honoring contracts and enforcing them is the true measure of a country’s status.  Does Mexico honor contracts? Not in the least.
 
Property rights are destroyed by invasions that take years to resolve and the sanctity of bank accounts and the security of those deposits mean nothing in Mexico. Even notaries and public registries falsify property sales and say no leans exist when in fact they do. You only find out after the purchase. These are not isolated incidents in Mexico.
nmex4.png
 
The municipality of Tulum, by rule of guns not law, seized boutique hotels and beach properties and threw their true owners out on the whim of a corrupt politician for personal gain. Property rights meant nothing and in the three or so years after these Tulum thefts, properties have still not been returned to the rightful owners. What a travesty of justice. Even when these sorts of travesties are recognized, the Mexican legal system does nothing to correct the errors.
 
Unprecedented levels of violence:
We really believed Mexico was changing 20 years ago. New auto plants, more hotels, more jobs and a true middle class starting to arise. We had hope and I think the Mexican people had hope too. But in the last five years we have witnessed the rise of the cartels stealing oil, cattle, avocados and anything else available, the rise of violence in unprecedented levels and the failure of the Mexican government to actually change anything. The only thing that changed was the slogan: hugs not guns. This is true insanity on a national level.
 
I wish I could say that I left Mexico in better shape than I found it. For my properties, this is true. But for Mexico in general it is not. I wish I could effect change but I can’t. I don’t get to vote, I don’t get to express an opinion to politicians or government workers and no one really cares what I have to say. The only protest afforded me is with my feet and I choose to leave.
 
I hope and pray that Mexico finds its way out of the pit it has dug. The Mexican people deserve better than what they are getting. They deserve hope, justice, fairness, and honesty. Right now, they are getting none of these.
 
Borderland Beat Reporter

This is beyond sad. Horrible that you've been treated in such a manner. Mexico deserves better. It's no surprise the citizens want to flee Mexico. The government has failed to protect the citizens. So now, the citizens owe the government nothing.

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hoechiminh

Mexico's corrupt government and cartels will eventually awake a sleeping giant which is the Mexican people. It only takes one person, one leader to surface the repressed rage of Mexicans, after that takes place everyone will clearly see who the real bosses of Mexico are.

 

Mark my words, in the coming years there will be a Duterte-like president in Mexico that will strike fear in the hearts of even the most brutal cartels.

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soulcal
On 7/25/2020 at 6:45 AM, huatulco said:

I'm not so sure about that. The difference would be that a citizen would use his 2d Amendment rights and blow the f-ers away. 

The article says way too much. The authors went in and got taken.  They didn't do their homework and cut corners.  They need to look in the mirror to see who's at fault.  Have they ever heard of the S&L crisis in the US a few years ago?  You pick up the news and at least once a month some idiot bookkeeper or trusted employee is arrested for embezzlement in the US.  

Where did they cut corners?

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Gringo Sin Ropa

I have mixed feelings about this article...

So great article, and I feel really bad for these people who lost so much in Mexico...

But...

I feel bad for them in the same way that I would feel bad for someone who decided to walk drunk down Baja California at 3 in the morning and got robbed..

Like WTF were you thinking? Or did were you just too naive about what the likely outcome would be...

20 million pesos in a mexican bank account? I couldn't fathom putting myself in such a position...

But yeah I feel bad for these people...I just don't understand why they didn't know better.

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Diggy

I think you're missing the point.  These people had written contracts for their land as well as bank insurance. The whole point being that in Mexico, a legal contract is not worth a cat's piss!

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Gringo Sin Ropa
10 minutes ago, Diggy said:

I think you're missing the point.  These people had written contracts for their land as well as bank insurance. The whole point being that in Mexico, a legal contract is not worth a cat's piss!

No, I get that part...but I guess I already figured contracts in Mexico don't amount to much...I mean whole sections of the country and economy are already run by cartels...I guess I just already had a very cynical view of Mexico and their laws and contracts...unfortunately these people did not. 

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soulcal
7 minutes ago, Gringo Sin Ropa said:

I have mixed feelings about this article...

So great article, and I feel really bad for these people who lost so much in Mexico...

But...

I feel bad for them in the same way that I would feel bad for someone who decided to walk drunk down Baja California at 3 in the morning and got robbed..

Like WTF were you thinking? Or did were you just too naive about what the likely outcome would be...

20 million pesos in a mexican bank account? I couldn't fathom putting myself in such a position...

But yeah I feel bad for these people...I just don't understand why they didn't know better.

I agree with you.  My thoughts while reading this torrid tale were why in the hell didn't they have the bulk of their money in a (or multiple) USA banks.  They should have known better. I'm sure any investment adviser even straight out of school would've told them to get your money out of Mexico ASAP!

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Diggy
33 minutes ago, Gringo Sin Ropa said:

No, I get that part...but I guess I already figured contracts in Mexico don't amount to much...I mean whole sections of the country and economy are already run by cartels...I guess I just already had a very cynical view of Mexico and their laws and contracts...unfortunately these people did not. 

True but then again besides their cartels, they sure have some of the finest conmen and conwomen around!

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Trav
Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, soulcal said:

I agree with you.  My thoughts while reading this torrid tale were why in the hell didn't they have the bulk of their money in a (or multiple) USA banks.  They should have known better. I'm sure any investment adviser even straight out of school would've told them to get your money out of Mexico ASAP!

In this vein, there is a short article in this week's Reader about some surfer dudes who drove a new Toyota Tacoma pickup to Rosarito .... Can you guess problemas with the local policía?   Mexican good Samaritan intervened and wound up beaten and in a jail cell with Tweakers ...  Worth a read.

Advice from Mexican Good Samaritan...Do not bring new cars to Mexico, only old beaters if you do not want trouble in Mexico....

Edited by Trav
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amosrolling
Posted (edited)

Yes, yes, it sucks in many ways that Mexico is a corrupt third-world country, and certainly its people deserve better.  But...many Americans go to Mexico because the strength of our currency and earning power makes it possible to live on another level.  Take a pensioner on $1800 social security.  Barely able to live in America, comfortable life in Mexico.  Take away the corruption and problems, then all of this disappears. (Not to mention the beautiful 19 year-old willing to suck your dick for $10).

These people need to treat Mexico like Mexico.  You don't go in thinking you are going to carve out a ranch.  You don't go in thinking you are going to start some big business; hell the guy couldn't even get a small pizzeria in the zona to go without being shaken down, not to mention what happened to Larry.  You certainly don't trust a Mexican bank with your life savings.  You go to live in Mexico when you have fixed income or an internet-based job; you rent a great property in a gated community for very little money, you don't buy, you use the power of your American dollars to live a life you could not afford at home.  You live near a crystal-watered beach, eat great food, and make love to young beautiful women.  You keep the bulk of your funds in an American bank, transferring small amounts to a Mexican bank to live on as needed.  This way you don't need to 'divorce' with the country when you realize that Mexico is Mexico. Geez, it's not that hard.

Edited by amosrolling
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Carlafan

Oh please God guys don't turn this into another political thread 

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3ls3gvnd0
11 hours ago, amosrolling said:

Yes, yes, it sucks in many ways that Mexico is a corrupt third-world country, and certainly its people deserve better.  But...many Americans go to Mexico because the strength of our currency and earning power makes it possible to live on another level.  Take a pensioner on $1800 social security.  Barely able to live in America, comfortable life in Mexico.  Take away the corruption and problems, then all of this disappears. (Not to mention the beautiful 19 year-old willing to suck your dick for $10).

These people need to treat Mexico like Mexico.  You don't go in thinking you are going to carve out a ranch.  You don't go in thinking you are going to start some big business; hell the guy couldn't even get a small pizzeria in the zona to go without being shaken down, not to mention what happened to Larry.  You certainly don't trust a Mexican bank with your life savings.  You go to live in Mexico when you have fixed income or an internet-based job; you rent a great property in a gated community for very little money, you don't buy, you use the power of your American dollars to live a life you could not afford at home.  You live near a crystal-watered beach, eat great food, and make love to young beautiful women.  You keep the bulk of your funds in an American bank, transferring small amounts to a Mexican bank to live on as needed.  This way you don't need to 'divorce' with the country when you realize that Mexico is Mexico. Geez, it's not that hard.

That's the bottom line.  Yeah, these folks got fvcked.  But, c'mon... what did they expect?  A ranch?  20 million pesos in a Mexican bank account?  For fvck's sake.  You should also be able to walk down any street in the US at 2am an not get mugged, but... we know that's not the case.  Their problems illustrate the overall issues with Mexico, but... how did they not realize they were playing with fire from the get-go?  A few (of the many) rules to live by in Mexico as a foreigner: (1) Don't keep more than US$10,000 in a Mexican bank account; (2) Don't buy property outside of areas where there are already a LOT of foreigners, and stick to homes and surrounding land, not a goddamn ranch; (3) Don't drive in the interior of the country; (4) Don't invest money in a business or venture in Mexico that you're not prepared to lose 100% of; (5) Don't draw attention to yourself - no fancy cars, huge estates... or ranches.  Mexico can be a great place to live but you gotta be realistic.  To quote the philosopher Harry Callahan: "A man's gotta know his limitations."

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soulcal
4 minutes ago, 3ls3gvnd0 said:

That's the bottom line.  Yeah, these folks got fvcked.  But, c'mon... what did they expect?  A ranch?  20 million pesos in a Mexican bank account?  For fvck's sake.  You should also be able to walk down any street in the US at 2am an not get mugged, but... we know that's not the case.  Their problems illustrate the overall issues with Mexico, but... how did they not realize they were playing with fire from the get-go?  A few (of the many) rules to live by in Mexico as a foreigner: (1) Don't keep more than US$10,000 in a Mexican bank account; (2) Don't buy property outside of areas where there are already a LOT of foreigners, and stick to homes and surrounding land, not a goddamn ranch; (3) Don't drive in the interior of the country; (4) Don't invest money in a business or venture in Mexico that you're not prepared to lose 100% of; (5) Don't draw attention to yourself - no fancy cars, huge estates... or ranches.  Mexico can be a great place to live but you gotta be realistic.  To quote the philosopher Harry Callahan: "A man's gotta know his limitations."

Harry Callahan!  :rofl1:

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PhordPhan

I've been reading about the Monex scandal, off and on, for a while. There is something extremely fishy, and by that I mean the reporting. It does look like lots of little guys were screwed, along with the bigger fish. But it seems there is more to the story that isn't being reported, probably due to shoddy "journalists." 

It's hard to tell for sure, but it sure looks like too many people were letting other people, like that Marcela character, handle their banking. It smacks of the Madoff scheme. I understand that his investors essentially made out checks to "Madoff Investments" or whatever he called it, instead of to the brokerage house itself. This is a YUGE red flag, BTW. You never hand over money to some "financial consultant." It sure looks like too many of these scammed retirees were doing something similar. The rest looks like pure fraud on the part of the bank, kind of like the Wells Fargo thing a few years ago, but worse. 

It sucks, but IMO if you're living in ANY foreign country, outside of Western Europe perhaps, you need to handle your financial transactions yourself, and you MUST keep close track of all activity. This shit could have been caught long ago had somebody been keeping an eye on their accounts regularly, and handling transactions personally.

 

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Cachondo

I spent a week in San Miguel de Allende around five years ago.  Seemed to definitely be a more prosperous location than TJ, and LOTS of gringos, but I didn't get far out into the poor areas.  I would have thought this place would be safer than TJ.  I will never open a Mexican bank account, let alone put a million dollars into it like the guy in this story.  Sounds like he must have been a permanent resident and was into a lot of investment properties.

 

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soulcal
7 hours ago, PhordPhan said:

I've been reading about the Monex scandal, off and on, for a while. There is something extremely fishy, and by that I mean the reporting. It does look like lots of little guys were screwed, along with the bigger fish. But it seems there is more to the story that isn't being reported, probably due to shoddy "journalists." 

It's hard to tell for sure, but it sure looks like too many people were letting other people, like that Marcela character, handle their banking. It smacks of the Madoff scheme. I understand that his investors essentially made out checks to "Madoff Investments" or whatever he called it, instead of to the brokerage house itself. This is a YUGE red flag, BTW. You never hand over money to some "financial consultant." It sure looks like too many of these scammed retirees were doing something similar. The rest looks like pure fraud on the part of the bank, kind of like the Wells Fargo thing a few years ago, but worse. 

It sucks, but IMO if you're living in ANY foreign country, outside of Western Europe perhaps, you need to handle your financial transactions yourself, and you MUST keep close track of all activity. This shit could have been caught long ago had somebody been keeping an eye on their accounts regularly, and handling transactions personally.

I remember reading about it also as there was a fair amount of publicity. End of the day, these poor folks trusted way, way to much and had far to much money in Mexican banks.  I'm surprised, for some smart people that after the antics started they didn't get their money out.

Best case, perhaps they win any cases they have pending, but I bet they're not holding their breath.  Shame on Mexico as they seemed to treat all of their employes super nice.

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