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Carlafan

"To give up"

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Carlafan

I've looked at several translations but haven't found anything accurate. Or I find something, then translate it back to English and it's not accurate. Any way to be able to say "give up" or maybe even "gave up" as well?

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ClamSlammer

"Ya me rendi." means I gave up.

"Me rindo" means I give up.

Rendir means to conquer or defeat but also means to surrender.  But it's a verb like "gustar."  Whereas the person saying it is the object and not the subject.  The literal translation of "me gusta" isn't "I like" but rather "it pleases me."  "Rendir" is the same way.  You wouldn't say "yo rindo" but rather "me rindo" because you are the object, the object of defeat which is the same as saying "I surrender" or "I give up."

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Erip
8 minutes ago, ClamSlammer said:

"Ya me rendi." means I gave up.

"Me rindo" means I give up.

Rendir means to conquer or defeat but also means to surrender.  But it's a verb like "gustar."  Whereas the person saying it is the object and not the subject.  The literal translation of "me gusta" isn't "I like" but rather "it pleases me."  "Rendir" is the same way.  You wouldn't say "yo rindo" but rather "me rindo" because you are the object, the object of defeat which is the same as saying "I surrender" or "I give up."

Ya see, there's another problem with Spanish -- not enough words.  I understand expressions of greetings and salutations being identical in several languages - e.g. Aloha; Shalom meaning "Welcome, Greetings and Goodbye".  Easy enough to figure out.  But the spanish word for conquer/defeat and surrender being identical?  Hmm...let's see - is this bugger claiming victory or surrendering?  Pretty odd.  I can see the old Monty Python troupe having fun with that one.

Fun Fact: Several years ago I read an article in the N.Y. Times reporting that English has 1 million words based on authoritative dictionaries.  By contrast, Spanish has only 250,000 words which explains the demand the language often makes to decipher meaning from context of usage and also, the dominance of slang on the streets to give nuance of meaning that "proper" words don't always provide.

 

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ClamSlammer
Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Erip said:

Ya see, there's another problem with Spanish -- not enough words.  I understand expressions of greetings and salutations being identical in several languages - e.g. Aloha; Shalom meaning "Welcome, Greetings and Goodbye".  Easy enough to figure out.  But the spanish word for conquer/defeat and surrender being identical?  Hmm...let's see - is this bugger claiming victory or surrendering?  Pretty odd.  I can see the old Monty Python troupe having fun with that one.

I understand what you mean but you must consider that "rendir" means "conquer" or "surrender" depending on whether you are the object or subject.  To make matters more confusing is that it also means "to pay."   The thing I find most confusing about Spanish is "si" meaning both "yes" and "if."  Electronic translators often can't differentiate the context and usually spit out the meaning as "yes" even though it clearly means "if" in that context.  What makes it worse is that often the word "si" can mean both "yes" and "if" in that context, and you have to figure out, often incorrectly, the meaning of the speaker.

Edited by ClamSlammer

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Trike

Spanish.........is a mother fucker..........

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sampson

So Rendi chicas give it up?

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Bubby
21 minutes ago, ClamSlammer said:

  What makes it worse is that often the word "si" can mean both "yes" and "if" in that context, and you have to figure out, often incorrectly, the meaning of the speaker.

I thought the difference between "yes" and "if" was the accent mark on "si".

Si without it is "if". Si with it is "yes". Of course, in speech there are no accents, and then it's all about context.

I'm just speculating because I'm pretty much a beginner with Spanish.

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amosrolling

Learning any language is a formidable endeavor.  If you are not a heritage speaker then it will be a journey that doesn't really have an end.  Don't get frustrated.  And hey, you are in a good hobby for learning Spanish.  I've become a functional, though by no means proficient speaker, just by being a hobbyist and modest but consistent effort as the years go by.

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Jefffffrey
1 hour ago, Erip said:

Ya see, there's another problem with Spanish -- not enough words. 

 

Understand that learning English is far more difficult than learning Spanish.  The reason English has so many rules and so many words is because it is a mix between Germanic and Romance and other languages.  We use different grammatical structures for no apparent reason.  We also have basically no rules for pronunciations, especially vowels.  The 'e' and 'a' make any number of sounds that we just memorize.  Even the few rules we do have like "i before e except after c" only works 75% of the time or so.  

Spanish is probably 80% latin, which gives it grammar rules that are easier to follow with less irregular verbs.  I remember when I was in high school my Spanish teacher explained Ebonics is the process of making irregular English verbs regular (almost all English verbs are irregular).

Obviously gender makes Spanish hard for English speakers but be grateful that 'a' makes the a sound and 'e' makes the e sound so on.  Be grateful that most Spanish verbs are regular.  It is much easier for us to follow Spanish than it is for a native Spanish speaker to understand us talking.

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Jefffffrey
2 hours ago, Carlafan said:

I've looked at several translations but haven't found anything accurate. Or I find something, then translate it back to English and it's not accurate. Any way to be able to say "give up" or maybe even "gave up" as well?

Socorro!

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Jefffffrey
2 hours ago, Carlafan said:

I've looked at several translations but haven't found anything accurate. Or I find something, then translate it back to English and it's not accurate. Any way to be able to say "give up" or maybe even "gave up" as well?

Do an experiment.  Next time you are with your favorita start tickling her.  See what she yells when she wants to "give up".

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Jefffffrey
2 hours ago, Carlafan said:

I've looked at several translations but haven't found anything accurate. Or I find something, then translate it back to English and it's not accurate. Any way to be able to say "give up" or maybe even "gave up" as well?

I think the context you are looking for is me doy por vencido

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spikebites
5 minutes ago, Jefffffrey said:

Do an experiment.  Next time you are with your favorita start tickling her.  See what she yells when she wants to "give up".

tickle = cosquillos.. just learned that.

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Erip
6 minutes ago, Jefffffrey said:

Do an experiment.  Next time you are with your favorita start tickling her.  See what she yells when she wants to "give up".

"BASTA BABOSO!!!!!!!!!!!!"

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tomjackin
17 minutes ago, Jefffffrey said:

I think the context you are looking for is me doy por vencido 

rendirse is a reflexive verb.

Thus, as mentioned before, I give up - me rendo, I gave up - me rendí

Luis Fonsi put out a song a while back ago called, No me doy por vencido. Meaning, I don't give up.

 

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Haus

People shouldn't give up so quickly, nobody likes a quitter.

 

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Carlafan
39 minutes ago, Jefffffrey said:

Do an experiment.  Next time you are with your favorita start tickling her.  See what she yells when she wants to "give up".

Just as long as she doesn't start peeing from being tickled. Or fart.

I also had found "me doy por vencido" as well. But Front Desk Chica said it didn't translate well to "give up".

 

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ClamSlammer
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bubby said:

c thought the difference between "yes" and "if" was the accent mark on "si".

Si without it is "if". Si with it is "yes". Of course, in speech there are no accents, and then it's all about context.

Thing is, if you put "si" into google translate, you get "yes."  If you put "sí" into google translate you get "yes" again.  I don't think translating apps take into consideration accent marks.  But "yes" is "sí" with an accent and "if" is "si" with no accent.

54 minutes ago, Jefffffrey said:

I think the context you are looking for is me doy por vencido

Could be true.  I'm not sure.  I've heard locals for sure say "ya me rendí" when they say they have given up.  I've never heard a local say "me doy por vencido."  Thing is, in English it is a strange saying.  It means surrender, but saying you "give up" makes no sense.  You're not giving a direction(up.)  It is slightly strange that the action of giving translates to the Spanish phrase of surrendering like it does in English.  For example, in English you "fall asleep."  But you don't actually fall.  You translate that to Spanish and they don't use the verb "fall," they use the phrase "quedo dormido" which uses the word "stay."

Anyway, what really bewilders me is some of the feminine nouns that are used for strictly masculine objects.  For example, la verga is the most masculine thing that exists.  Yet it is a feminine noun.  "Leche" means semen.  But leche is only produced by females and is a feminine noun.  Men have "huevos" yet biologically only females produce huevos.  

Edited by ClamSlammer
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KCQuestor
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bubby said:

I thought the difference between "yes" and "if" was the accent mark on "si". Si without it is "if". Si with it is "yes". Of course, in speech there are no accents, and then it's all about context.

Even when texting, lots of people leave off the accent as it is an extra step and context is definitely king. It's hard to tell if someone is asking IF you are doing something vs telling you YES you should do something.

When speaking, I am always sure to not pause after I say "If" and to pause or even stop if I say "Yes"

"Si me voy al centro..." = "If I am going downtown..."

"Si, me voy al centro..." = "Yes, I am going downtown..."

Edited by KCQuestor
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Jefffffrey
Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, ClamSlammer said:

Could be true.  I'm not sure.  I've heard locals for sure say "ya me rendí" when they say they have given up.  I've never heard a local say "me doy por vencido."  Thing is, in English it is a strange saying.  It means surrender, but saying you "give up" makes no sense.  You're not giving a direction(up.)  It is slightly strange that the action of giving translates to the Spanish phrase of surrendering like it does in English.  For example, in English you "fall asleep."  But you don't actually fall.  You translate that to Spanish and they don't use the verb "fall," they use the phrase "quedo dormido" which uses the word "stay."

You are starting to do what most people trying to learn another language almost never do.  You are thinking about why you say things the way you say things in your native language.  You hit the nail on the head because what do we really mean when we say "give up"?  I think give up was once closer to surrender but maybe now closer to quit.  Slight changes in meaning over time makes it difficult to accurately translate.

I taught English for a time and that is the only reason I started thinking of these things.  

This is why the best way to learn a foreign language is to emerse yourself in that language and not try to translate.  Not easy when you go to another country sporadically.

Edited by Jefffffrey
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smoothburnn
1 hour ago, spikebites said:

tickle = cosquillos.. just learned that.

Speaking of just learning  something, after all these years, I just learned that  [ Uy = Oops ]   

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soulcal
5 hours ago, Trike said:

Spanish.........is a mother fucker..........

Not to you amigo. Now math... :dunno:

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PhordPhan
19 hours ago, ClamSlammer said:

Anyway, what really bewilders me is some of the feminine nouns that are used for strictly masculine objects.  For example, la verga is the most masculine thing that exists.  Yet it is a feminine noun.  "Leche" means semen.  But leche is only produced by females and is a feminine noun.  Men have "huevos" yet biologically only females produce huevos.  

I agree about the gender not making sense. Women wear dresses, but vestido is masculine. Senos are fun to play with, yet a masculine noun. Other stuff makes no sense at all, like mapa (masculine), clima (masculine), problema (masculine), and, my favorite, agua (feminine but you still say "el").

I will point out that many things, like leche and huevos, are called that simply because of their appearance. 

 

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soulcal
2 hours ago, PhordPhan said:

I will point out that many things, like leche and huevos, are called that simply because of their appearance. 

Holy molly Phord!  I never put 2+2 together on the above based solely on appearance but you had me busting up!  :rofl1:

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KCQuestor
Posted (edited)

Don't forget "el día" is masculine, hence "buenos días". "El tema" (the theme, or topic) is masculine also. Spanish doesn't have neuter nouns like Latin does, so they became masculine despite the -a endings.

2 hours ago, PhordPhan said:

my favorite, agua (feminine but you still say "el").

El agua is different because it is actually feminine. They just use "el agua" because saying "la agua" sounds like "lagua". Other similar words are "El alma" (soul), "el ave" (bird), and "el aguila" (eagle).

Edited by KCQuestor
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